Latest Headlines

Fox News Latest Headlines

Tupac receives star on Hollywood Walk of Fame days before what would be his 52nd birthday

Late rapper Tupac Shakur received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Wednesday, just days before what would have been his 52nd birthday.

Shakur's sister, Sekyima "Set" Shakur, who accepted the star on behalf of the family, shed tears while describing her brother's dream of one day being honored on the Walk of Fame.

"From the first time he stepped foot on this stage of the Apollo Theater at 13 years old, before anyone recognized his name, he knew he had the dream to have a star here on the Walk of Fame," she said before the reveal.

The Walk of Fame said it was decided in 2013 that Shakur would receive a star, but the organization allowed his family and estate to select the date. They chose June 7 – nine days before his birthday on June 16.

LATE TUPAC SHAKUR TO BE HONORED WITH A STREET NAME IN CALIFORNIA

His sister described Wednesday's ceremony as a tribute to Shakur's career in the music industry and his "lasting impact" in the world.

"Today, we’re not just honoring a star in the ground, but we’re honoring the work and the passion that he’s put into making his dreams come true," she said.

Shakur, who was 25 years old when he was killed in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles on Sept. 7, 1996, is described as one of hip-hop's most prolific figures. Despite his professional music career being cut short after only five years, he has sold more than 75 million records worldwide.

His diamond-certified album "All Eyez on Me," which was released in February 1996, features notable hits "California Love (Remix)," "Ambitionz Az a Ridah," and "I Ain't Mad at Cha."

In 2017, he was the first solo hip-hop artist to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

TEN YEARS AFTER HIS DEATH, TUPAC STILL A HIP-HOP LEGEND

Shakur was also an actor who played starring roles in several films, including "Poetic Justice," "Gang Related," "Juice" and "Above the Rim."

Radio Personality Big Boy, who emceed the ceremony, spoke about the rapper's impact on the entertainment industry, acknowledging the various museum exhibits, documentaries and movies dedicated to his life.

Big Boy also shouted out several attendees, including comedian Mike Epps, rapper YG, actor Bokeem Woodbine and the Outlawz, a rap group that was founded by Shakur.

Shakur's star is the 2,758th on the Walk of Fame.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Rural Oregon movement to join 'Greater Idaho' gains traction with vote in 12th county

Wallowa County became the twelfth Oregon county to join the "Greater Idaho" movement when special election results on the measure were finalized Tuesday.

The vote originally took place in May, with preliminary results showing support for the effort leading by only 21 votes. After all votes were finalized in June, the lead shrunk to only seven votes, narrowly avoiding the state requirement for a recount.

The "Greater Idaho" effort originally began in 2020 as an idea for large swaths of rural eastern Oregon to secede and join the more conservative Idaho to get away from the western, progressive part of the state. 

With Wallowa County's vote, 12 out of 12 counties that have held an election on a "Greater Idaho" measure of any kind have voted in favor of exploring the move.

Support for a proposal in the Idaho legislature for formal talks between the two states' legislatures about redrawing the border has been split across party lines with Democrats opposing the idea and Republicans applauding it.

"I'm very pleased this measure has virtually no chance of advancing into reality," Democratic Idaho Senate Minority Leader Melissa Wintrow told Fox News Digital in March. "It would be bad for all involved and bad for the country, and I am opposed to it at all levels."

In contrast, Republican state Rep. Judy Boyle said, "Yes, I am supportive of the Greater Idaho idea. I have lived along the Oregon border my entire life, so have many east Oregon friends. They have been quite frustrated with the liberal I-5 western Oregon corridor running their state and completely ignoring their values and needs. They have finally come down to asking the voters, county by county, if they want to join Idaho. Currently, 11 counties have said YES [sic]!"

‘GREATER IDAHO’ MOVEMENT TO ABSORB CONSERVATIVE RURAL COUNTIES FROM LIBERAL OREGON GAINS MOMENTUM 

Should the "Greater Idaho" effort be successful Idaho’s population would increase by 21%. An analysis by the Claremont Institute also found that moving the Idaho state line could provide an annual net benefit to the state’s government by as much as $170 million.

Moving the Idaho-Oregon border would require the approval of both state legislatures as well as the U.S. Congress.

Following Wallowa County’s results, the Crook County Court also voted in favor of placing the Greater Idaho proposal up for a vote on the May 2024 ballot. So far, Umatilla County and Gilliam County are the only Oregon counties listed in the original proposal of 15 counties to relocate that have not yet set up a vote on the issue.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"That’s what you call the skin of your teeth," Wallowa County Clerk Sandy Lathrop remarked on the county's extremely close results just barely avoiding a recount.

Based on Oregon state law, KOIN reported, "a recount is required if a measure fails to exceed one-fifth of 1% of the vote. In Wallowa County, 3,497 votes were cast for the ‘Greater Idaho’ measure, leaving a recount threshold of 6.99 votes." Because the difference in support was seven votes, the measure did not go to a recount.

Massive NATO air drill to simulate attack on member nation: 'our red line'

NATO is set to launch its largest-ever air force deployment in its history in a training scheme intended to stimulate an attack on an allied nation, officials said Wednesday.

The drill – dubbed Air Defender 23 – will take place Monday over Germany and involve 10,000 participants and 250 aircraft from 25 countries, including 100 aircraft and 2,000 personnel from the U.S., as first reported German news outlet DW.

The exercises are meant to ensure a coordinated response from NATO allies under Article 5 of the alliance's charter, which states that an attack on a NATO member nation is considered an attack on all the members.

EUROPEAN LEADERS SAY NATO ALLIES NEED TO BOOST SUPPORT FOR UKRAINE, ADD COUNTRY TO ALLIANCE

"We are showing that NATO territory is our red line, that we are prepared to defend every centimeter of this territory," German Air Force Lt. Gen. Ingo Gerhartz reportedly said.

The German commander also insisted that these drills are meant to be purely defensive in nature and will not fly near Russian airspace. 

"We won't, for example, conduct any flights toward Kaliningrad. This is intended to be defensive," he said.

Still, U.S. Ambassador to Germany Amy Gutmann said the drills will be substantial and "absolutely impressive to anybody who's watching."

NATO RAMPS UP PRESSURE ON TURKEY TO DROP OBJECTIONS, ALLOW SWEDEN TO JOIN MILITARY ORGANIZATION

"It will demonstrate beyond a shadow of a doubt the agility and the swiftness of our allied force in NATO as a first responder," she told reporters. "I would be pretty surprised if any world leader was not taking note of what this shows in terms of the spirit of this alliance, which means the strength of this alliance."

"And that includes [Russian President Vladimir] Putin," she added.

Questions immediately arose over how the massive air drills will affect civilian air traffic, and NATO officials looked to ease concerns by noting that the disruptions would be "minimal."

"We anticipate minimal interruptions in the flow of civilian airlines," Michael Loh, director of the U.S. Air National Guard, said from Berlin.

Gerhartz said that while steps have been taken to make sure air traffic is not disrupted, he also noted that "you don't get security for free."

"If we want to demonstrate that we are ready to defend this country and this alliance, we have to accept this," he said.

Reuters contributed to this report.

AI should require license like medical, nuclear work on advanced tools: Britain's Labour Party

The United Kingdom should prohibit technology developers from working on advanced artificial intelligence tools unless they have a license to do so, according to the British Labour Party.

Lucy Powell, a spokesperson for Britain's main left-wing political party, told the Guardian this week that much stricter rules should be imposed on companies regarding the training of their AI products on large datasets similar to those used by OpenAI to build ChatGPT.

"My real point of concern is the lack of any regulation of the large language models that can then be applied across a range of AI tools, whether that's governing how they are built, how they are managed or how they are controlled," said Powell, who suggested AI should be licensed similarly to both the medical field and nuclear power. Both fields are tightly regulated by British government bodies.

"That is the kind of model we should be thinking about, where you have to have a license in order to build these models," she told the Guardian. "These seem to me to be the good examples of how this can be done."

GOVERNMENTS WORLDWIDE RUSH TO PLACE REGULATIONS ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, A RAPIDLY GROWING TECHNOLOGY

Powell emphasized that the government's focus should be on regulating technological development rather than banning certain technologies outright, as the European Union as done with facial recognition tools.

"This technology is moving so fast that it needs an active, interventionist government approach, rather than a laissez-faire one," she said. "Bias, discrimination, surveillance — this technology can have a lot of unintended consequences."

Experts have expressed concern about the potential of AI being weaponized to manipulate information and promote certain ideologies. Another concern is the datasets themselves on which products such as ChatGPT are based containing biased or discriminatory information having downstream effects, such as if AI tools are used to help make hiring and firing decisions.

Powell's comments came on the same day that Matt Clifford, an adviser to British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, warned in an interview that AI could have the power to be behind advances that "kill many humans" in just two years' time. Clifford also cited the potential for AI to create dangerous cyber and biological weapons that could lead to many deaths.

"It's certainly true that if we try and create artificial intelligence that is more intelligent than humans and we don’t know how to control it, then that's going to create a potential for all sorts of risks now and in the future," said Clifford. "So, I think there’s lots of different scenarios to worry about, but I certainly think it's right that it should be very high on the policymakers' agendas."

Sunak recently met with leading AI researchers and acknowledged the potential "existential threat" posed by AI.

AI DRONE SWARM SHOWS MILITARY MIGHT BUT ALSO QUESTIONS OF WHO HOLDS THE POWER

"The PM and CEOs discussed the risks of the technology, ranging from disinformation and national security, to existential threats," the participants said in a joint statement. "The PM set out how the approach to AI regulation will need to keep pace with the fast-moving advances in this technology."

Weeks earlier, the outgoing British chief scientific adviser warned that AI could prove as transformational as the Industrial Revolution, urging politicians to act immediately to prevent significant job loss.

"There will be a big impact on jobs, and that impact could be as big as the Industrial Revolution was," Sir Patrick Vallance told the House of Commons' science, innovation and technology committee. "There will be jobs that can be done by AI, which can either mean a lot of people don’t have a job or a lot of people have jobs that only a human could do."

Powell similarly told the Guardian that she believed the disruption to the British economy could be as drastic as the deindustrialization of the 1970s and 1980s. 

Sunak arrived in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday for a two-day visit. During their meeting, the British prime minister is reportedly hoping to pitch the United Kingdom as a world leader in artificial intelligence governance.

Meanwhile, the Labour Party is working to finalize its own policies on advanced technology. Keir Starmer, the Labour leader, is reportedly expected to give a speech on the subject next week.

US National Weather Service warns smoky haze likely to persist for days across the US, Canada

The thick, hazardous haze blanketing the Northeast disrupting daily life for millions of people across the U.S. and Canada could persist until the weekend, a U.S. National Weather Service meteorologist said. 

The weather system that’s driving the great Canadian-American smoke out,  a low-pressure system over Maine and Nova Scotia, "will probably be hanging around at least for the next few days," U.S. National Weather Service meteorologist Bryan Ramsey said.

"Conditions are likely to remain unhealthy, at least until the wind direction changes or the fires get put out," Ramsey said. "Since the fires are raging — they’re really large — they’re probably going to continue for weeks. But it’s really just going to be all about the wind shift."

The weather system is expected to hardly budge, the smoky blanket billowing from wildfires in Quebec and Nova Scotia and sending plumes of fine particulate matter as far away as South Carolina.

The dystopian-looking haze covering bustling metropolises like New York City has left the city veiled in a yellow and orange haze as residents resort to wearing pandemic-era masks to block thick smoke.

CANADA CELEBRATES ANNUAL CLEAN AIR DAY, AS FIRES CONTINUE TO RAVAGE NORTHEASTERN US

Health officials from Vermont to South Carolina and as far west as Ohio and Kansas are warning residents that spending time outdoors could cause respiratory problems due to high levels of fine particulates in the atmosphere.

In Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered schools to cancel outdoor recess, sports and field trips Thursday. In suburban Philadelphia, officials set up an emergency shelter so people living outside can take refuge from the haze.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul called the situation an "emergency crisis." 

BIDEN SPEAKS WITH CANADIAN PRIME MINSTER, OFFERS ADDITIONAL SUPPORT IN WAKE OF HISTORIC WILDFIRES

The normal air quality index is 50. However, in parts New York on Wednesday, June 7, the air quality index was nearly 8 times the normal level-- reaching over 400. 

More than 400 blazes burning across Canada have left 20,000 people displaced. The U.S. has sent more than 600 firefighters and equipment to Canada. Other countries are also helping.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau spoke to President Joe Biden by phone on Wednesday. Trudeau’s office said he thanked Biden for his support and that both leaders "acknowledged the need to work together to address the devastating impacts of climate change."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Courtroom disaster pits Prince Harry against himself

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have worked hard to exhaust every venue, from podcast, to autobiography, to Netflix in their efforts to define themselves as victims and to defame the royal family. On Tuesday, the prince tried a new one: a British courtroom.

They are a couple who take themselves deadly seriously, but previously have been able to set some rules and choose sympathetic (and less than rigorous) interviewers. This drama is different because it subjects their claims to disciplined legal examination in an environment that they cannot control.

It's likely to be a whole lot more grueling under examination by "a beast in court." That’s how Andrew Green KC (or King’s Counsel) has been described in UK attorney ranking, "Legal500" Look out now for a new level of humiliation.

PRINCE HARRY’S UK COURT BATTLE: ROYAL FEARED BEING ‘OUSTED’ OVER ‘DAMAGING' RUMOR THAT JAMES HEWITT IS HIS DAD

Harry's claim is that a series of articles written between 1996 and 2010 by the Mirror Group included unlawful information-gathering practices, most notably, phone hacking.

Things haven't started well in his efforts to substantiate that. Already, on day one, the embattled prince outdid himself, admitting contradictions between his memoir and his evidence.

In his pursuit of victimhood and further attention, he got more than he bargained for. 

Harry is proving the rule observed by the royal family that keeping out of politics and courtroom is by far the safest approach. This has always made good practical sense, allowing the public to feel that the monarch might not differ from their point of view. 

Victorian-era prime minister Benjamin Disraeli is said to have coined the phrase "never complain, never explain," that succinctly describes the late queen's approach. Would that her grandson could understand the good sense in it.

In similar vein, the royal family has gone out of its way to avoid the inside of courtrooms. The last time a member of the close family gave evidence was over 130 years ago when Queen Victoria’s son (subsequently Edward VII) was drawn into an illegal gambling scandal. 

It was reported that in this court case, "the sight of the heir to the throne being cross-examined caused substantial damage to the future king’s reputation — and royal courtiers with long memories have since done their best to keep royals out of the courtroom." 

Prince Harry and his wife’s calculating attempts to cause reputational damage to his family have backfired consistently. If he had avoided this path, it might have spared him further negative scrutiny. 

Things started off with a bang Monday as the trial judge, Justice Timothy Fancourt expressed dismay and "a little surprise," that Harry chose to skip the first day’s proceedings entirely, allegedly delayed by daughter Lilibet’s birthday. 

When the star witness finally arrived Tuesday, his testimony defamed his whole nation: "Our country is judged globally by the state of our press and our government — both of which I believe are at rock bottom. Democracy fails when your press fails to scrutinize and hold the government accountable, and instead choose to get into bed with them so they can ensure the status quo."

These words are particularly shocking, coming from a prince whose ancestral line has striven for over 1,000 years to uphold and champion the nation it has served. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

Harry emerged from the proceedings, battered and on the defensive. In the course of the questioning, he had to admit, not only that he had sparse evidence to back up his claims, but that some of his court allegations contradicted what he expressed in his autobiography, "Spare." 

Oprah had been a pushover in her 2021 interview of the Sussexes compared to Green. By pursuing this litigation Harry inherited a far-less forgiving inquisitor. 

Harry and Meghan never disappoint when it comes to courting trouble. They have complained about suffering endlessly from media intrusion. But, that’s exactly what they have done to Harry’s family.

To make it even more unfair, Harry Is free to pursue legal action because he withdrew from royal life, while the family he sold personal information about cannot defend themselves.

Much has been lampooned by the likes of "South Park" and Chris Rock, but in the end, we are witnessing the tragedy of a deeply unhappy troubled man who blames everyone but himself for his failures owing to his own bad decisions.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM LEE COHEN

Oklahoma approves first taxpayer-funded religious school, setting stage for legal battles

Oklahoma authorities approved the first faith-based charter school in the country, as supporters of the decision believe it will hold up in the face of expected legal challenges.

The Oklahoma State School Board on Monday voted 3-2 to approve an application by the Catholic Archdiocese of Oklahoma City to establish the St. Isidore of Seville Virtual Catholic Charter School as an online public charter school.

Brett Farley, the executive director of the Catholic Conference of Oklahoma, spoke with "Fox & Friends First" Wednesday about the move.

"What we're trying to achieve here is to deliver more options to kids, largely in the rural areas of our state, that are stuck with one option. And most often those options are just inadequate," Farley told "Fox & Friends First" co-host Carley Shimkus.

"We have a great need in that area, also in the special needs area where kids just need more specialized education and options are the name of the game. And so we've been about this as a Catholic Church for 500 years. We want to continue to expand those options to those kids that need it." 

Oklahoma Attorney General Gentner Drummond (R) said that public funding for the school is an issue, per a public statement his office released.

NORTH HOLLYWOOD PARENTS BOYCOTT SCHOOL DISTRICT'S PLANNED PRIDE ASSEMBLY: 'KEEP YOUR KIDS HOME'

"The approval of any publicly funded religious school is contrary to Oklahoma law and not in the best interest of taxpayers," Drummond said. "It’s extremely disappointing that board members violated their oath in order to fund religious schools with our tax dollars. In doing so, these members have exposed themselves and the State to potential legal action that could be costly."

Farley pushed back saying that Drummond is "at odds with Supreme Court precedent."

"The U.S. Supreme Court has said now three times in the last six years that a state does not need to fund private schools. But if they choose to do so, they cannot discriminate against religious institutions … they've been emphatic about that. So we're relying on Supreme Court precedent here."

Although Drummond opposes the measure, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt supports the move.

In an interview with Fox News Digital last month, Stitt said the state's new school choice law allows students to pursue their "God-given talents" at any school in the state.

"Now every single parent, regardless of zip code, can take their kid to the school of their choice, and they're going to get a tax credit, a refundable tax credit to go to a Christian school, a private school, a charter school, wherever they want," Stitt said.

Stitt signed into law a legislative package that included tax credits for families with children in private schools as well as additional funding for rural schools and raises for teachers. The tax credits range from $5,000 to $7,500 per student depending on household income.

"God gave kids to parents, not to the government," Stitt told Fox News. "So let's put them in charge of where they go."

Chris Licht’s CNN ousting paves way for trio of Jeff Zucker-era holdovers to satisfy staffers

CNN CEO Chris Licht's abrupt exit on Wednesday paved the way for a trio of Jeff Zucker disciples to lead the long-struggling network on an interim basis.

Zucker, who was forced out last year ahead of a long-planned merger that put CNN under the control of Warner Bros. Discovery, became synonymous with left-wing opinion programming. Zucker was beloved by staffers, and many of CNN’s biggest stars were openly distraught when he was terminated. Licht, who replaced Zucker, was never embraced by his predecessor’s loyal soldiers who remained in place, and by the end of his tenure, he was a dead man walking; one insider told Fox News Digital his departure was "inevitable." 

Less than two years later, CNN’s ship needs a new captain and staffers are pleased that three holdovers from the Zucker era are stepping up. 

CEO CHRIS LICHT OUT AT CNN

Executive Vice President of talent and content development Amy Entelis, EVP of editorial Virginia Moseley and EVP of U.S. programming Eric Sherling, along with recently appointed Chief Operating Officer David Leavy, who is close with Warner Bros. Discovery CEO David Zaslav, will run CNN on an interim basis. 

A former CNN journalist said the new leadership team provided instant stability to the network, adding Zucker was still deeply missed.

A CNN insider said they were the right ones for the job, keeping the network afloat while a search for a permanent new CEO is underway, and they would not be asked to do much different from their current roles while Leavy ran the business.

They added Zaslav said the right things on the morning call announcing Licht's dismissal, where he warmly praised the CNN staffers, many of whom had been mortified by Licht's shots at the network's earlier coverage on issues like COVID-19 and the implication they were biased and flawed in their reporting.

Some observers felt Licht was fired because liberal CNN personalities resented his attempt to straighten out the network and become a meeting place for both sides of the aisle. 

"It was an internal coup, led by on-air talent… at the network, even its own media team, that ultimately brought [Licht] down. And why? Because many could not accept the fact that Licht was attempting to move the network from being seen by conservatives and many independents as an activist news network," Joe Concha said on "America’s Newsroom" shortly after the Licht’s departure was announced. 

CNN MEDIA REPORTER DELIVERS BRUTAL ON-AIR ASSESSMENT OF CEO CHRIS LICHT'S TENURE: ‘SERIES OF SEVERE MISSTEPS’

"He got cancel cultured because he wanted to level the ideological playing field," another CNN insider told Fox News Digital. 

While CNN employees rejoiced, critics noticed a potential red flag when the interim leadership team was announced.

"Conflict of interest alert: CNN is promoting news executive Virginia Moseley, who is married to Tom Nides, Biden's ambassador to Israel," Media Research Center executive editor Tim Graham tweeted. 

Moseley is married to Tom Nides, a high-powered former Morgan Stanley executive who President Biden nominated to serve as ambassador to Israel in 2021. Prior to that, he served as deputy secretary of state for management and resources under Hillary Clinton from 2011 to 2013 and was considered for a key White House or State Department position if Clinton was elected president. 

Nides is planning to leave the ambassador position over the summer.

CNN told Fox News Digital that "Virginia will recuse herself from anything regarding Israel" when asked if Moseley’s husband creates a conflict of interest in her new role. 

CNN STAFFERS CONTINUE UNDERMINING BOSS BY TOUTING CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR'S BLISTERING TAKEDOWN OF TRUMP TOWN HALL

Entelis helped bring Moseley to CNN after the duo both cut their teeth at ABC News when it was considered a "toxic" workplace. At the time, the Disney-owned news operation was known to be cold and unsympathetic to rank-and-file staffers, where the top priority for ABC News executives was to keep broadcasting legends Peter Jennings and Diane Sawyer happy. 

Entelis and Moseley are known to be tight, and they are well-liked by the staffers who rejected Licht’s vision.

"Love them both," one responded when asked about Entelis and Moseley. 

Entelis, who like Moseley joined CNN in 2012, held multiple high-level positions over 30 years at ABC News and oversaw talent when the network hired future CNN personalities including Jake Tapper, Jim Sciutto and Chris Cuomo. Tapper was among the prominent CNN anchors who expressed concerns about Licht’s leadership, according to the Wall Street Journal

In one of the most public examples of lewd behavior at ABC News, political journalist Mark Halperin apologized at the height of the #MeToo movement for sexual harassment allegations made against him while he was employed with ABC News during Entelis’ time as a top executive. Halperin's tenure at ABC News spanned into the 1990s and early 2000s.

"Amy Entelis and Virginia Moseley have never had to answer for looking the other way at Mark Halperin’s widely observed sexual misconduct when they were in senior executive roles at ABC News and when, specifically, Amy oversaw talent," a longtime media industry executive told Fox News Digital.

TED TURNER BIOGRAPHER SAYS CNN FOUNDER ‘REALLY UNHAPPY’ WITH DYSFUNCTION-PLAGUED NETWORK: 'IT'S APPALLING'

"Now they’ve exported that same toxic culture to CNN. For years, they’ve both carried out the policies of liberal news bosses such as David Westin and Jeff Zucker," the executive continued. "And Virginia, whose husband is an extremely wealthy, high-level Biden official and part of Hillary Clinton’s inner circle, has no business being the top editorial manager unless we want to see CNN backslide into left-wing advocacy."

Sherling is the least-known of the three Zucker holdovers but has worked at CNN for over a decade and helped launch Tapper's dayside show.

Leavy was brought in this month to serve as chief operating officer and handle the business side of things at the drama-filled network, in a move that signaled Licht's days were numbered. It’s unclear if there is any editorial hierarchy among the others, but the Warner Bros. Discovery honchos are satisfied with them on an interim basis.

"While we know we have work to do as we look to identify a new leader, we have absolute confidence in the team we have in place," Zaslav said. 

CNN CEO CHRIS LICHT'S BIG MESS: INSIDERS SAY HE'S LOST NEWSROOM AFTER TRUMP TOWN HALL, BRUTAL ATLANTIC STORY

Ex-CNN anchor Brian Stelter, who was fired by Licht last year and remains in regular contact with many of his former colleagues, relayed on CNBC Wednesday that staffers were "relieved" at Licht's dismissal.

CNBC reporter Alex Sherman remarked that Licht took "marching orders" from Zaslav, who along with board member John Malone had signaled a hope for CNN to return to a less partisan approach than it employed under Zucker.

"The question now is, if you're going to find a new leader, do you task that new leader with a new vision for CNN?" Sherman asked. "Or do you just keep kind of repeating the same things you've been saying about CNN like, well, it used to be an advocacy network, now we want to make it down the middle... I don't know if that's enough of a vision to get everyone there on board with the mission."

"A lot of us when we were at CNN in the Trump years felt we were advocating for the truth, advocating for reality," Stelter said. "Others felt that was left-leaning."

Stelter said there may be a desire to have a less contentious political environment, but it wasn't realistic, saying CNN couldn't just deliver "the plain vanilla news" when that's not what people seem to want.

Licht released a statement on Wednesday evening. 

"This was an exciting but incredibly challenging assignment and I learned a lot over the past 13 months. I’ve been lucky enough to have had a successful, fulfilling career and I look forward to my next chapter. I wish the team at CNN the very best, always," he said. 

Biden speaks with Canadian prime minister, offers additional support in wake of historic wildfires

President Biden offered additional resources to Canada during a phone call with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Wednesday as historic wildfires rage through the country, pushing smoke into American states as far south as North Carolina.

The president has directed all available federal firefighting assets to be deployed in efforts to suppress the hundreds of fires impacting Canadian and American communities, according to a release from the White House.

As of Wednesday evening, the U.S. has sent more than 600 firefighters and support personnel across the border to assist with the response.

"The two leaders also discussed continued cooperation to prevent wildfires and address the health impacts that such fires have on our communities," the White House said, adding that Biden and Trudeau remain in "close touch" for emerging needs.

NYC MAYOR ADAMS, HEALTH COMMISSIONER WARN NEW YORKERS TO MASK UP AS AIR QUALITY DIPS TO WORST SINCE 1960S

Trudeau confirmed on Twitter Wednesday evening that hundreds of American firefighters "recently arrived" in Canada and more are on the way, adding that he is thankful for the "critical support."

Both leaders took the opportunity to blame the fires on climate change, with Biden including in a tweet that Canada's record wildfires are "intensifying because of the climate crisis."

Trudeau echoed similar sentiments in a longer tweet, writing: "We’re seeing more and more of these fires because of climate change. These fires are affecting everyday routines, lives and livelihoods, and our air quality. We’ll keep working – here at home and with partners around the world – to tackle climate change and address its impacts."

CANADA WARNS OF RECORD 2023 WILDFIRE DESTRUCTION AS TRAVELING SMOKE IMPACTS MILLIONS OF AMERICANS

As of Thursday morning, there are 439 active wildfires in Canada, and 250 of those are considered out of control, according to the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre. The same data reveals 116 of the 439 wildfires are under control and 73 are being held.

An interactive map from Natural Resources Canada showed parts of Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia face the greatest fire risk as of Wednesday.

Smoke from the fires in eastern Canada has drifted south into the United States, prompting unhealthy and hazardous air quality alerts from the mid-Atlantic through the northeast and parts of the Upper Great Lakes, according to AirNow.

As of midnight on Thursday, multiple areas in the northeastern region were facing "hazardous" air quality index levels of over 400, forcing warnings to "avoid all outdoor activity."

NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY SCHOOLS KEEP KIDS INDOORS AS AIR QUALITY PLUMMETS REPORTEDLY FROM CANADA WILDFIRES

Most of the cities experiencing the highest alert level were in the Pennsylvania - New Jersey region, with Philadelphia reaching 407 and Trenton reaching 416.

New York City was also experiencing a "hazardous" alert with an air quality index level of 301.

As the smoke is expected to continue impacting the U.S. for days to come, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued the following recommendations: wear a N95 respirator mask if the air seems smoky, limit time outdoors by only performing essential activities and reschedule outdoor work tasks.

Sucralose, a chemical in Splenda, is found to cause ‘significant health effects’ in new study

Sucralose, a chemical found in the popular zero-calorie sweetener Splenda, has been shown to cause damage to DNA, raise the risk of cancer and cause leaks in the gut lining, according to a new study from North Carolina State University.

Splenda is used as a sugar substitute in thousands of foods, beverages, desserts and candy. The product contains 1.10% sucralose. It is made by Tate & Lyle in the U.K.

The study, published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, found that a metabolite of sucralose, called sucralose-6-acetate, is "genotoxic." 

POPULAR ARTIFICIAL SWEETENER, ERYTHRITOL, COULD RAISE RISK OF HEART ATTACK AND STROKE: STUDY

That means it breaks down the genetic material that makes up DNA, explained Susan Schiffman, PhD, senior author of the study and an adjunct professor at North Carolina State University.

When DNA strands break and are then rearranged and repaired, that can increase the risk of cancerous cells forming, previous studies have shown.

In addition, both sucralose and sucralose-6-acetate were shown to cause damage to the "tight junctions" that hold together the intestinal barrier, leading to a "leaky gut."

"A leaky gut is problematic because it means toxins that would normally be flushed out of the body in feces are instead leaking out of the gut and being absorbed into the bloodstream," Schiffman told Fox News Digital. 

The researchers conducted eight separate experiments to measure the safety and risks of both sucralose and sucralose-6-acetate, which is a chemical byproduct of sucralose and is considered an impurity.

"An important point is that even if the contaminant sucralose-6-acetate is totally removed from sucralose products, it is still generated by bacteria in the gut," Schiffman warned.

This isn’t the first research to flag potential dangers related to sucralose.

"Previous studies have shown a wide range of adverse effects from sucralose, including dysbiosis (including damage to good bacteria in the gut) and alteration of blood glucose and insulin," Schiffman said.

"Consumers have a right to know what they are consuming," she added.

Michelle Routhenstein, a New York-based heart health dietitian at EntirelyNourished.com, was not involved in the sucralose study, but said she was not surprised by the findings.

"In the last couple of years, we have been seeing more and more research studies pointing to the inflammatory nature of artificial sweeteners, primarily impacting the gut microbiome," she told Fox News Digital.

Routhenstein recommends avoiding sugar substitutes as much as possible because of the association between underlying inflammation, oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease, she said. 

SUGAR SUBSTITUTES NOT ADVISED FOR WEIGHT LOSS OR DISEASE PREVENTION, SAYS WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

"Sucralose and other sugar substitutes are also considered ultra-processed foods, which have been linked to increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events in individuals who have had a heart attack," Routhenstein added.

Those who are at risk of cardiovascular disease, have cancer or suffer from any inflammatory conditions could be particularly susceptible to risks, the dietitian noted.

"While artificial sweeteners may be tolerable in generally healthy individuals, they should be eliminated if there are any signs of bloating, indigestion, constipation or diarrhea," she said.

Kelly Johnson-Arbor, MD, a medical toxicologist and co-medical director at the National Capital Poison Center in Washington, D.C., reviewed the study findings and advised caution.

"Although artificial sweeteners like sucralose were promoted as healthy alternatives to sugar for decades, improvements in medical technology have allowed scientists to perform more extensive testing on these chemicals and their potential toxicities," she said in a statement to Fox News Digital. 

"The results of these studies show that these compounds may be associated with significant health effects," she added.

While the short-term consumption of sucralose and other artificial sweeteners is unlikely to cause harmful side effects, Johnson-Arbor said, this particular study found that sucralose can accumulate in tissues after continued exposure, suggesting that chronic or long-term consumption of the sweetener may be more dangerous than previously thought.

When the earlier safety studies were performed, the identification of sucralose-6-acetate as an impurity may not have been fully realized, she pointed out.

"These results are concerning because they show that such impurities may have significant — or even greater — toxicity than the original compound," the toxicologist said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved sucralose for use in 1998 in 15 food categories. A year later, the agency approved the chemical as a general-purpose sweetener. 

After reviewing this latest study from North Carolina State University, the Calorie Control Council in Washington, D.C., defended sucralose as a safe product that has been "extensively tested."

The Council also called into question the reliability of the new study.

SUGAR SUBSTITUTES MAY INTERFERE WITH LIVER’S ABILITY TO DETOXIFY, RESEARCHERS SAY

"This study was conducted in a laboratory environment, which cannot mimic the complex mechanisms of the human body, even when human cells are used," said Robert Rankin, president of the Calorie Control Council, in a statement sent to Fox News Digital.

(Study author Schiffman maintained that "the study was done in human tissue, so it is directly relevant to potential human health issues.")

"For the millions of people who rely on low- and no-calorie sweeteners to help manage body weight and reduce the risk of non-communicable diseases like diabetes and obesity, it is important to know the facts, which is that sucralose has been rigorously studied by scientific and regulatory authorities around the world and is safe to consume," Rankin added.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

The International Sweeteners Association, based in Brussels, also said it stands behind sucralose.

"Sucralose, like all other low/no calorie sweeteners, plays an important role in providing consumers choice with sweet-tasting options with low or no calories," wrote an ISA spokesperson in a statement provided to Fox News Digital. 

"Sucralose has undergone one of the most extensive and thorough testing programs conducted on any food additive in history, resulting in consensus on its safety throughout the global scientific and regulatory community," the spokesperson added.

Fox News Digital also reached out to Tate & Lyle, the maker of Splenda, but the company had not provided comment by publication time.